Chapter Citations

Chapter 1: Introduction to Law Librarianship

i. “About,” Jenkins Law Library, last modified April 10, 2018, accessed January 13, 2021, https://www.jenkinslaw.org/about.

ii. “Archives Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, last modified March 29, 2019, accessed January 13, 2021, https://www.aallnet.org/about-us/what-we-do/policies/association-policies/archives-policy/.

iii. “By The Numbers,” American Association of Law Libraries, last modified June 3, 2020, accessed January 13, 2021, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/.

iv. Paul D. Healey, “Pro Se Users, Reference Liability, and the Unauthorized Practice of Law: Twenty-Five Selected Readings,” Law Library Journal 94, no. 1 (2002): 133.

Chapter 3: Accessibility

i. The term “universal design” was coined by architect and designer Ronald L. Mace (1941-1998). Mace was stricken by polio as a young boy and used a wheelchair throughout the rest of his life. Through his own experience, Mace became aware of the difficulties people with disabilities faced simply trying to navigate the built environment, and as an architect, devised new ways of approaching building design to reduce the segregation of and discrimination towards those with disabilities. Joy E. Weeber, “Ronald L. Mace, American Architect,” Encyclopedia Britannica, July 30, 2020, https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ronald-L-Mace.

ii. There are seven principles that inform universal design: (1) equitable use; (2) flexibility in use; (3) simple and intuitive use; (4) perceptible information; (5) tolerance for error; (6) low physical effort; (7) size and space for approach and use. Bettye Rose Connell et al., The Principles of Universal Design, Ver. 2.0, North Carolina State University Center for Universal Design, Apr. 1, 1997 https://projects.ncsu.edu/ncsu/design/cud/about_ud/udprinciplestext.htm. There are many ways in which these principles can be understood and applied, and anyone working to increase accessibility and usability should learn more about them.

iii. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 §501, 29 U.S.C. §791.

iv. Rehabilitation Act of 1973 §504, 29 U.S.C. §794.

v. The technology requirement is found in section 508, which was added to the 1973 law in 1986. Pub. L. 99-506, Title VI, § 603(a), 100 Stat. 1830 (1986). Later amendments occurred every few years through 2000. See Pub. L. 100-630, Title II, § 206(f), 102 Stat. 3312 (1988); Pub. L. 102-569, Title V, § 509(a), 106 Stat. 4430 (1992); Pub. L. 105-220, Title IV, § 408(b), 112 Stat. 1203 (1998); Pub. L. 106-246, Div. B, Title II, § 2405, 114 Stat. 555 (2000).

vi. Sutton v. United Air Lines, Inc., 527 U.S. 471 (1999).

vii. ADA Amendments Act of 2008, Pub. L 110-325, 122 Stat. 3553 (2008).

viii. 21st Century Communication and Video Accessibility Act: Pub. L. 111-260, 124 Stat. 2751, Oct. 2010, codified at 47 U.S.C. §§ 303, 613 nt., 617-20. Section 508 amendments: Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, Pub. L. 105-220, 112 Stat. 936, Aug. 1998, codified at 29 U.S.C. §794d. Regulations: See, e.g, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Standards and Guidelines, 82 Fed. Reg. 5790, Jan. 18, 2017. Cases: There is still a split among the federal Courts of Appeals as to whether commercial websites must be accessible. Some courts have said that under the ADA’s “places of public accommodation” language, only businesses with brick-and-mortar locations need to have accessible websites. Others have decided that commercial websites are, in and of themselves, places of public accommodation. See Amanda Robert, “ADA questions remain over web accessibility cases and the lack of DOJ regulations,” ABA Journal, American Bar Association, July 1, 2019, https://www.abajournal.com/magazine/article/ada-web-accessibility-doj-regulations. The requirements for government entities at any level and virtually all educational institutions are not in doubt—digital accessibility is required.

ix. “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” Dept. of Justice, Sept. 15, 2010, https://www.ada.gov/regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm.

x. “Guide to the ADA Standards, Chapter 2: Alterations and Additions,” U.S. Access Board, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-ada-standards/guide-to-the-ada-standards/chapter-2-alterations-and-additions.

xi. The U.S. Access Board’s Guide to the ADA Standards is an excellent starting point for understanding the standards. “Guide to the ADA Standards,” U.S. Access Board, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-ada-standards/guide-to-the-ada-standards. The standards are also available from the Department of Justice, who is responsible for promulgating and enforcing them. “ADA Standards for Accessible Design,” Dept. of Justice, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.ada.gov/2010ADAstandards_index.htm. Note that there are two sets of standards, one from 1991 and one from 2010. Which set applies depends on the start date of construction/alteration.

xii. “Guide to the ADA Standards, Chapter 2: New Construction,” U.S. Access Board, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/buildings-and-sites/about-the-ada-standards/guide-to-the-ada-standards/chapter-2-new-construction#2039.

xiii. “Closed” captioning refers to captions that must be turned on to be visible. Open captions are always present and visible to everyone. Ahmed Khalifa, “Open Captions vs Closed Captions: What’s the Difference Between These Captions Options?,” Hear Me Out, December 7, 2018, https://hearmeoutcc.com/open-captions-vs-closed-captions/.

xiv. It is the text describing non-spoken noises that distinguishes captions from subtitles, at least in the U.S. and Canada.

xv. It also fails to capture extra contexts such as music or sound effects, but that is typically not a big problem in research instruction videos.

xvi. “Introduction to Understanding WCAG 2.1: Understanding the Four Principles of Accessibility,” Web Accessibility Initiative, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG21/Understanding/intro#understanding-the-four-principles-of-accessibility.

xvii. “Home,” W3C Web Accessibility Initiative, accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.w3.org/WAI/.

xviii. “Resources,” WebAIM, accessed August 1, 2020, https://webaim.org/.

xix. “WAVE Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool,” WebAIM, accessed August 1, 2020, https://wave.webaim.org/.

xx. There are quite a few screen readers available. Well-known examples include JAWS, which is frequently used by Windows users; NVDA, which is open source and free to use but is only available for Windows; and VoiceOver, which is built into the Mac OS. “Screen Readers,” American Foundation for the Blind, accessed July 26, 2020, https://www.afb.org/blindness-and-low-vision/using-technology/assistive-technology-products/screen-readers.

xxi. Kudos to HeinOnline for having a feature on its website that lets a sighted user view the website in the same order the screen reader “sees” it. This makes working with a visually impaired user much easier.

xxii. A word of warning: although Styles can be helpful, bullets and numbering in Word can be frustrating for people using screen readers. My colleague, Rena Seidler, worked extensively with a blind student using a screen reader, and bullets and numbering are very frustrating for him.

xxiii. For further information on making materials more accessible, see Susan David deMaine, “From Disability to Usability in Online Instruction.” Law Library Journal 106, no. 4 (Dec. 2014): 531-561. https://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/facpub/2871/.

Chapter 5: Advocating for the Law Librarian Profession

i. Jootaek Lee, “Frontiers of Legal Information: The Law Librarians of the Future,” International Journal of Legal Information 43, no. 2-3 (Summer-Winter 2015): 411-433.

ii. Elizabeth Caulfield, “Is This a Profession? Establishing Educational Criteria for Law Librarians,” Law Library Journal 106, no. 3 (Summer 2014): 287-328.

iii. Kristy McPhee, “Law Librarians and Legal Work: The Regulatory Grey Area Preventing a Greater Contribution,” Australian Law Librarian 26, no. 3 (2018): 160-161.

iv. Mike McCaffery, “The Education and Training of Future Law Librarians: A View from the Rest Home,” TALL Quarterly 36, no. 2 (Winter 2017): 5.
v. 5 Paul T. Jaeger and Ursula Gorham, “The Education of Law Librarians in the United States from the Library School Perspective,” Journal of Education for Library and Information Science 58, no. 1 (Winter 2017):10-11.

vi. McCaffery, Future Law Librarians, 5.

vii. Renee Nichole Allen, Alicia Jackson, and DeShan Harris, “The Pink Ghetto Pipeline: Challenges and Opportunities for Women in Legal Education,” University of Detroit Mercy Law Review 96, no. 4 (Summer 2019): 526-527.

viii. Allen, Jackson, and Harris, Women in Legal Education, 534-538.

ix. Charlotte D. Schneider, “Inclusion and Participation: Law Librarians at Law Faculty Meetings,” Law Library Journal 107, no. 1 (Winter 2015): 115-126.

x. Judith A. Siess, Visible Librarian: Asserting Your Value with Marketing and Advocacy (Chicago: Batson Printing, 2003), 90-92.

xi. Emily Feltren, “Law Librarian Advocacy in 2013,” AALL Spectrum 18, no. 3 (December 2013): 4.

xii. Gerald Fowke, “Librarians Before Congress: Advocacy and Identity,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 37, no. 3-4 (2018): 236-256.

xiii. Carol Parker, “The Need for Faculty Status and Uniform Tenure Requirements for Law Librarians,” Law Librarian Journal 103, no. 1 (Winter 2011): 7-38.

xiv. Carol A. Parker, “How Law Schools Benefit When Librarians Publish, Teach, and Hold Faculty Status,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 30, no. 3 (2011): 237-253.

xv. Kara Noel, “The Unbundling of Legal Services and its Implications for Law Librarianship,” Legal Services Quarterly 34, no. 4 (2015): 263-267.

xvi. Robert C. Berring, “The End of Scholarly Bibliography: Reconceptualizing Law Librarianship,” Law Library Journal 104, no. 1 (Winter 2012): 77-78.

xvii. Berring, End of Scholarly Bibliography, 76-78.

xviii. James G. Milles, “Legal Education in Crisis, and Why Law Libraries are Doomed,” Law Library Journal 106, no. 4 (2014): 515-520.

xix. Lauren Comito, Alqae Geraci, and Christian Zalbriskie, Grassroots Library Advocacy (Chicago: American Library Association, 2012), 2-3.

xx. Paul T. Jaeger et al., “Waking Up to Advocacy in a New Political Reality for Libraries,” Library Quarterly 87, no. 4 (2017):361-362.

xxi. Paul T. Jaeger et al., New Political Reality for Libraries, 361-362.

xxii. Catherine M. Dunn, “Effective Advocacy Making Yourself Heard,” AALL Spectrum 16, no. 2 (November 2011): 15-18.

xxiii. Dunn, Making Yourself Heard, 15-18.

xxiv. Comito, Geraci, and Zalbriskie, Grassroots Library Advocacy, 2-3.

xxv. B.J. Ard, “Librarians as Privacy Advocates,” I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society 13, no. 1 (Fall 2016): 161-174.

xxvi. Laura J. Ax-Fultz, “Igniting the Conversation: Embracing Legal Literacy as the Heart of the Profession,” Law Library Journal 107, no. 3 (Summer 2015): 421-440.

xxvii. Comito, Geraci, and Zalbriskie, Grassroots Library Advocacy, 14-21.

xxviii. Michael E. Lackey and Joseph P. Minta, “Lawyers and Social Media: The Legal Ethics of Tweeting, Facebooking and Blogging,” Touro Law Review 28, no. 1 (2012): 161-165.

xxix. Joelie Cook, “Advocacy AALL Style: Inspiration for Application in Australia,” Australian Law Librarian 22, no. 3 (2014): 160.

xxx. Lee Sims, “Evolution and Opportunity: Collection Development of Skills Specific Resources in the Wake of the ABA’s Revised Standards,” Law Library Journal 108, no. 2 (Spring 2016): 271-273.

xxxi. Lynne F. Maxwell, “The Emperor’s New Library: The Decline and Fall of Academic Law Libraries Or a New Chapter,” Rutgers Law Record 44 (2016-2017): 68-70.

xxxii. Linda Kawaguchi, “Assessing Academic Law Libraries Performance and Implementing Change: The Re-Organization of a Law Library,” University of Toledo Law Review 49, no. 1 (Fall 2017):36-56.

xxxiii. Ryan Metheny, “Improving Lives by Building Social Capital: A New Way to Frame the Work of Law Libraries,” Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (Fall 2017):636-641.

xxxiv. Aoife Lawtown, The Invisible Librarian: A Librarian’s Guide to Increasing Visibility and Impact (Waltham: Chandos Publishing, 2016), 274-275.

xxxv. Stacy Etheredge, Peggy Roebuck Jarrett, and Karen Westwood, “The Ins and Outs of Advocacy,” AALL Spectrum 22, no. 4 (March/April 2018):34-36.

xxxvi. Lawton, Invisible Librarian, 274-275.

xxxvii. Stephanie Burke, “Took Your Own Horn- Law Librarians Should Communicate the Value of Their Profession out of Its Ranks,” AALL Spectrum 8, no. 5 (March 2004): 12-13.

xxxviii. Metheny, Building Social Capital, 645-647.

xxxix. Paul Genoni, Hellen Merrick, and Michele A. Willson, “Scholarly Communities, E-Research Literacy, and the Academic Librarian, The Electronic Librarian 24, no. 6 (2006): 743-744.

xl. James M. Donovan, “Order Matters: Typology of Dual-Degreed Law Librarians,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 33, no. 1 (2014): 1-2.

xli. Alex Zhang, “Discovering the Knowledge Monopoly of Law Librarianship Under the DIKW Pyramid,” Law Library Journal 108, no. 4 (Fall 2016): 611-621.

xlii. Jennifer Allison, “Law Librarianship,” in Mastering Subject Specialties: Practical Advice From the Field, ed. Karen Sobel (Santa Barbara: Libraries Unlimited, 2016), 58-59.

xliii. Micheal J. Slinger and Rebecca M. Slinger, “The Law Librarian’s Role in the Scholarly Enterprise: Historical Development of the Librarian/Research Partnership in American Law Schools,” Journal of Law & Education 39, no. 3 (July 2010): 396.

xliv. Michael Chiorazzi and Alexandra Lee Delgado, “Those Who Do, Teach: Preparing Law Librarianship Students for the Teaching of Legal Research,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 37, no. 2 (2018): 140-145.

xlv. Ellie Margolis and Kristen Marray, “Using Information Literacy to Prepare Practice Ready Graduates,” University of Hawi’i Law Review 39, no.1 (Winter 2016): 21-30.

xlvi. Duncan Alford, “The Development of the Skills Curriculum in Law Schools: Lessons for Directors of Academic Law Libraries,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 28, no. 3-4 (2009): 306-309.

xlvii. Alyson M. Drake, “You Can’t Write Without Research: The Role of Research Instruction in the Upper-Level Writing Requirement,” Florida Coastal Law Review Law Review 18, no. 2 (Spring 2017): 182-186.

xlviii. Karen Rowe-Nurse, “The Creative Law Librarian: Continuing Professional Development: Why and How,” Australian Law Librarian 23, no. 1 (2015): 26-27.

xlix. David McClure, “Joining the Conversation: Law Library Assistance Programs and Current Criticisms of Legal Education,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 32, no. 4 (2013): 280-281.

l. Nolan L. Wright, “Standing at the Gates: A New Librarian Wonders about the Future Role of the Profession in Legal Research Education,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 27, no. 4 (2008): 323-324.

li. Jaeger and Gorham, Education of Law Librarians, 11.

lii. James G. Milles, “Legal Education in Crisis, and Why Law Libraries are Doomed,” Law Library Journal 106, no. 4 (2014): 515-520.

liii. Milles, Why Law Libraries are Doomed, 518.

liv. Milles, Why Law Libraries are Doomed, 518-520.

lv. Jaeger and Gorham, Education of Law Librarians, 10-11.

lvi. Maxwell, Emperor’s New Library, 51-57.

lvii. Channarong Intahchomphoo, Margo Jeske, and Emily Landriault, “Social Media Objectives and Challenges for Law Libraries: a Systematic Literature Review,” Legal Information Management 16, no. 4 (2016): 260-262.

lviii. Marcia D. Baker, “Are We Recording? The Evolution of a Law Library Radio Show,” AALL Spectrum 15, no. 3 (December 2010): 14-15.

lix. Yolanda P. Jones, “Bringing the Law to the Library: The Importance of Librarian Mediation in Access to Justice Services,” Legal Reference Services Quarterly 37, no. 1 (2018): 32-36.

Chapter 6: Policy Development and Strategic Planning

i. “Strategic Planning,” <em “>Legal Research and Law Library Management (Law Journal Press, 2020), § 1.02

ii.  “Strategic Planning,” Legal Research and Law Library Management (Law Journal Press, 2020), § 1.02

iii. “Strategic Planning,” <em “>Legal Research and Law Library Management(Law Journal Press, 2020), § 1.04

iv. Roberta F. Studwell, “The Strategic Academic Law Library Director in the Twenty-FirstCentury,” Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (Fall 2017): 649-672

Chapter 7: Access to Justice

i. Then dean of the School of Law at the University of Nebraska and later to become dean of Harvard Law School. The speech was entitled “The Causes of Popular Dissatisfaction with the Administration of Justice,” it identified problems with both the bench and bar and our system of justice. See Stein, Robert. “Causes of Popular Dissatisfaction with the Administration of Justice in the Twenty-First Century.” HAMLINE LAW REVIEW 30 (2007): 15.

ii. S. Shepherd Tate, “Access to Justice,” American Bar Association Journal 65, no. 6 (1979): 904.

iii. “Law Libraries and Access to Justice: A Report of the American Association of Law Libraries Special Committee on Access to Justice,” July 2014. https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/AccessToJusticeSpecialCommittee2014LawLibrariesAndAccessToJustice.pdf.

iv. “Access to Justice Commissions,” accessed July 22, 2020, https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_aid_indigent_defendants/resource_center_for_access_to_justice/A2J-commissions/.

v. Charles Dyer, Jennifer Frazier, and Brian Huffman, “Public Librarians and the Access to Justice Conference: Three Member Perspectives,” SCCLL News 36, no. 1 (2010): 12–15.

vi. “Who We Are,” LSC – Legal Services Corporation: America’s Partner for Equal Justice, accessed July 31, 2020, https://www.lsc.gov/node/316.

vii. “Public Library Toolkit,” Legal Information Services to the Public SIS (blog), accessed July 31, 2020, https://www.aallnet.org/lispsis/resources-publications/public-library-toolkit/.

viii. “Toolkit,” Government Law Libraries SIS (blog), accessed July 31, 2020, https://www.aallnet.org/gllsis/resources-publications/toolkit/.

ix. “Law Libraries and Access to Justice: A Report of the American Association of Law Libraries Special Committee on Access to Justice,” July 2014, 28.

x. “Law Libraries and Access to Justice: A Report of the American Association of Law Libraries Special Committee on Access to Justice,” 32.

xi. ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools. (CHICAGO: AMER BAR Association, 2019), 16–18.

xii. Tim Nelson, “Library Usage Increases with the Recession,” MPR News, December 18, 2008, https://www.mprnews.org/story/2008/12/18/library-usage-increases-with-the-recession.

xiii. “Public Library Toolkit.”

xiv. “Legal Research Guides – College of Law – University of Idaho,” accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.uidaho.edu/law/library/legal-research/guides.

xv. “Collections,” Legal Information Services to the Public SIS (blog), accessed August 1, 2020, https://www.aallnet.org/lispsis/resources-publications/public-library-toolkit/collections/.

xvi. Laura K Abel and Max Rettig, “State Statutes Providing for a Right to Counsel in Civil Cases,” 2006, 26.

xvii. First mentioned by U.S. Federal District Judge Robert A. Sweet in Robert W. Sweet, “Civil Gideon and Confidence in a Just Society Colloquium: Part Three: Multiplying Models,” Yale Law & Policy Review 17, no. 1 (1998): 503–6.

xviii. David Allen Larson, “Access to Justice for Persons with Disabilities: An Emerging Strategy,” Laws 3, no. 2 (2014): 220–38.

xix. “Social Workers in Public Libraries » Public Libraries Online,” accessed December 14, 2020, http://publiclibrariesonline.org/category/news-opinion/social-workers-in-public-libraries/.

Chapter 9: technical Services

i. American Bar Association, Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar, 2019-2020 ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools (Chicago: American Bar Association, 2019), 39-40, https://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/legal_education_and_admissions_to_the_bar/standards/2019-2020/2019-2020-aba-standards-chapter6.pdf.

ii.  Ellen McGrath, “A Century’s Worth of Access: A Historical Overview of Cataloging in Law Library Journal,” Article, Law Library Journal 106, no. 3 (Summer 2014).

iii. Eric Miller, Bibliographic Framework as a Web of Data: Linked Data Model and Supporting Services, Library of Congress, Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 2012/11/21, https://www.loc.gov/bibframe/pdf/marcld-report-11-21-2012.pdf.

iv. “Cataloging and Acquisitions (Library of Congress),” updated 2020/06/24, https://www.loc.gov/aba.

v. Marshall Breeding, “Five Key Technology Trends for 2018,” Computers in Libraries (December 2017 2018), http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/dec17/Breeding–Five-Key-Technology-Trends-for-2018.shtml.

Chapter 13: Faculty Services

i. Black’s Law Dictionary 1083 (Thomson Reuters, 11th ed. 2019).

Chapter 16: Pedagogy

i. “Standard 302: Learning Outcomes.” ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools, 15.  Chicago, IL: American Bar Association, 2019.

ii. Benjamin Samuel Bloom and Lorin W. Anderson, A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing: a revision of Bloom’s (Harlow: Pearson Education, 2014).

iii. Elizabeth Sherowski, “Change Your Syllabus, Change Your Life,” Law Teaching(blog), August 8, 2018, http://lawteaching.org/2018/08/08/change-your-syllabus-change-your-life/.

iv. “Standard 314: Assessment of Student Learning.” ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools, 23.  Chicago, IL: American Bar Association, 2019.

v. “Standard 303: Curriculum.” ABA Standards and Rules for Approval of Law Schools, 16-17.  Chicago, IL: American Bar Association, 2019.

vi. See generally, Vernellia R. Randall, “Increasing Retention and Improving Performance: Practical Advice on Using Cooperative Learning in Law Schools,” Thomas M. Cooley Law Review 16, no. 2 (1999): 201-278

vii. For example, the following libraries have created certificates tied to their workshop series:

viii. For a more thorough discussion of embedded conferences, see Alyson M. Drake, “On Embracing the Research Conference,” Law Library Journal 111, no. 1 (Winter 2019): 7-30.

Chapter 17: Public Education, Programs, and Access to Justice at the Law Library

i. American Association of Law Libraries. 2014. “Law Libraries and Access to Justice: A Report of the American Association of Law Libraries Special Committee on Access to Justice.” 21-32. https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/.

ii. Putnam, Robert D. 2000. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, 20-21, 287-349. New York: Simon & Schuster.

iii. Varheim, Andreas, et al. 2008. “Do Libraries Matter? Public Libraries and the Creation of Social Capital.” Documentation 64: 877.

iv. Klinenberg, Eric. 2002. Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

v. Metheny, Ryan. 2017. “Improving Lives by Building Social Capital: A New Way to Frame the Work of Law Libraries.” Law Library Journal 109, no. 4: 631.

Chapter 20: COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE – BREAKING IT DOWN

i. Whitside, Dave. Stop Doing the Legal Limbo, Legal Current (Dec 12, 2012), available at http://www.legalcurrent.com/stop-doing-the-legal-limbo-2/ (last viewed 12.27.2020)

ii. Id.

Chapter 22: Future of Law Firm Libraries

i. David Lat, “The State of Biglaw and the Evolving Role of the Law Librarian,” Above the Law, accessed November 22, 2020, https://abovethelaw.com/2018/07/the-state-of-biglaw-and-the-evolving-role-of-the-law-librarian.

ii. Richard Susskind, Tomorrow’s Lawyers: An Introduction to Your Future (Oxford University Press, 2013).

iii. Jordan Furlong, “What Will Lawyers Do Now?” Law Twenty One, accessed November 22, 2020, https://www.law21.ca/2020/01/what-will-lawyers-do-now.

iv. James Jones, Milton C. Regan, and Steve Seemer, 2020 Report on the State of the Legal Market, Georgetown Law and Thomson Reuters Legal Executive Institute, accessed November 22, 2020, https://images.thomsonreuters.com/Web/TRlegalUS/%7B169f0d36-6fcd-4cc1-bd84-878b713055cb%7D_2020_Report_on_the_State_of_the_Legal_Market-191231.pdf.

v. Roy Strom, “Despite Growth, Report Warns Market Shifting for Law Firms,” Bloomberg Law, accessed November 22, 2020, https://news.bloomberglaw.com/us-law-week/despite-growth-report-warns-market-shifting-for-law-firms.

vi. Debra L. Bruce, “Responding to the Commoditization of Legal Services: Adapt and Differentiate Your Practice in Order to Compete in the New Marketplace,” Law Practice, American Bar Association, accessed November 22, 2020, https://www.westlaw.com/Document/I50c5b67f9e3411e498db8b09b4f043e0/View/FullText.html?transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)&VR=3.0&RS=cblt1.0.

vii. Robert Ambrogi, “New Report Underscores the Evolving Role of Law Librarians,” Above the Law, accessed November 22, 2020, https://abovethelaw.com/2019/04/new-report-underscores-the-evolving-role-of-law-librarians/?rf=1.

viii. “Legal Trends Report, 2019,” Clio, accessed November 22, 2020, https://www.clio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/2019-Legal-Trends-Report.pdf.

ix. Thomas S. Clay and Eric A. Seeger, “2019 Law Firms in Transition: An Altman Weil Flash Survey,” (Altman Weil, 2019), viii-ix, accessed November 22, 2020, http://www.altmanweil.com//dir_docs/resource/28BC6AB5-10E9-418D-AED2-B63D1145F989_document.pdf.

x. Jordan Furlong, “Law Librarians & the Future of Law Firms,” AALL Spectrum, November/December 2019 (23-25).

xi. Clay and Seeger, “Law Firms in Transition,” viii-ix.

xii. Cynthia Brown, “Old Skills, New Tricks: Opportunities for Law Librarians,” Law360, accessed November 22, 2020, https://www.law360.com/articles/834463/old-skills-new-tricks-opportunities-for-law-librarians.

xiii. Ari Kaplan, “Reinventing the Modern Law Firm From Information Out: Embracing the Power of Practical Innovation and the Impact of Raising your Profile,” Keynote Address, 2020 PLLIP Summit, July 10, 2020.

xiv. <em “>Merriam Webster Dictionary (online), s.v. “innovation,” accessed November 22, 2020, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/innovation.

xv. Design Thinking for Libraries: A Toolkit for Patron-Centered Design, (IDEO, 2015), 6.

xvi. Joe J. Marquez and Annie Downey, Getting Started in Service Design: A How-To-Do-It Manual For Librarians, (American Libraries Association, 2017).

xvii. AALL State of the Profession 2019 Snapshot, >(American Association of Law Libraries, 2019), 81.

xviii. <em
xix. State of the Profession Report, 9.

xx. Toby Brown, “Legal Information Professionals: The Next Generation,” AALL Spectrum,“> November/December 2020, 13-14.

xxi. Cynthia Brown and Allison C. Reeve, “At Littler Mendelson, Tradition Meets Innovation,” in “A Day in My Law Library Life, Circa 2018,” compiled by Scott Frey, Law Library Journalt”>, 111:1 (2019), 80-82.

xxii. AALL State of the Profession2019 Snapshot, American Association of Law Libraries, 5.

xxiii. Amanda Runyon (ALL-SIS Task Force on Library Marketing and Outreach), “Marketing and Outreach in Law Libraries: A White Paper,” Law Library Journal, 105, no. 4, 2013 (525-538) and Karin Johnsrud, “What Makes an Outreach Librarian: Delving into Outreach Librarian Duties and Responsibilities,” AALL Spectrum, July 2014, 20-21.

Chapter 23: Navigating Your Career Goals: Government, Private & Academic Law Librarianship

i. Yemisi Dina, Law Librarianship in Academic Libraries: Best Practices (Amsterdam: Chandos Publishing, 2015), 78, ProQuest Ebook Central.

ii. Such sources include the following: Barbara A. Bintliff et al., “Rebuilding the Profession: Recommendations for Librarians Interested in Becoming Academic Law Library Directors,” Law Library Journal 99, no. 1 (Winter 2007): 101-32; Yemisi Dina, Law Librarianship in Academic Libraries: Best Practices (Amsterdam: Chandos Publishing, 2015), 75-82, ProQuest Ebook Central; Carol A. Parker, “The Need for Faculty Status and Uniform Tenure Requirements for Law Librarians,” Law Library Journal 103, no. 1 (Winter 2011): 7-38; Carol A. Parker, “Tenure Advice for Law Librarians and Their Directors,” Law Library Journal 103, no. 2 (Spring 2011): 199-218; Spencer L. Simons, “What Interests Are Served When Academic Law Library Directors Are Tenured Faculty – An Analysis and Proposal,” Journal of Legal Education 58, no. 2 (February 2012): 245-73; Michael J. Slinger and Sarah C. Slinger, “The Career Path, Education, and Activities of Academic Law Library Directors Revisited Twenty-Five Years Later,” Law Library Journal 107, no. 2 (Spring 2015): 175-224.

Chapter 24: Negotiating Salary & Benefits

i. One study found that participants who negotiated raised their starting salary by $5000 on average. Marks, Michelle and Harold, Crystal. “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” Journal of Organizational Behavior 24 (March 2011): 386. Another study finding that applicants who negotiated raised their starting salary by $1500 on average and that the applicants who did not negotiate saw no increase in the initial salary offer and the final offer essentially losing the opportunity for an increase in the final offer O’Shea, Patrick & Bush, David, “Negotiation for Starting Salary: Antecedents and Outcomes Among Recent College Graduates,” Journal of Business and Psychology 16, no. 3 (2002): 376-377.

ii. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 366.

iii. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 386.

iv. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 386.

v. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 372.

vi. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 366.

vii. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 366.

viii. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 378-379.

ix. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 378-379.

x. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 374.

xi. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 377.

xii. Babcock, Linda, and Laschever, Sara, Women Don’t Ask : Negotiation and the Gender Divide, Introduction. (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2003), 12, ProQuest Ebook Central edition. See also, Kolb, Deborah M. “Too Bad for the Women or Does It Have to Be? Gender and Negotiation Research over the Past Twenty-Five Years” Negotiation Journal 242, no. 4 (October 2009): 518.

xiii. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 377.

xiv. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 387.

xv. O’Shea and Bush, “Negotiation for Starting Salary,” 374.

xvi. Crothers, Laura, et al., “Gender differences in salary in a female-dominated profession,” Gender in Management: An International Journal 25(7) (2010): 606.

xvii. American Association of Law Libraries, “2020 AALL MEMBERSHIP SURVEY REPORT,” 2020. https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/.

xviii. Miller, Claire, “As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops,” New York Times (New York, NY), March 18, 2016.

xix. Miller, Claire, “As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops,” New York Times (New York, NY), March 18, 2016.

xx. Miller, Claire, “As Women Take Over a Male-Dominated Field, the Pay Drops,” New York Times (New York, NY), March 18, 2016.

xxi. Meyer, Richard W.,”Librarian salaries: Paid what we’re worth?.” College & Research Libraries News [Online], 51 no. 6 (1990): accessed  July 23, 2020, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/19440/22791

xxii. Meyer, “Librarian salaries,” https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/19440/22791 .

xxiii. Meyer, “Librarian salaries,” https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/article/view/19440/22791 .

xxiv. United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, “Occupational Outlook Handbook: Librarians,” last modified December 16, 2019, https://www.bls.gov/OOH/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm.

xxv. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Salary Survey 2019,” last modified 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/salary_survey/aall-salary-survey-2019/.

xxvi. Geraci, Aliqae and Farrell, Shannon, “Normalize Negotiation! Learning to Negotiate Salaries and Improve Compensation Outcomes to Transform Library Culture,”,” last modified May 22, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2019/normalize-negotiation/.

xxvii. Geraci and Farrell, “Normalize Negotiation!,” last modified May 22, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2019/normalize-negotiation/.

xxviii. Geraci and Farrell, “Normalize Negotiation!,” last modified May 22, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2019/normalize-negotiation/.

xxix. Lo, Leo and Reed, Jason, “’You’re Hired!’ – An Analysis of the Perceptions and Behaviors of Library Job Candidates on Job Offer Negotiations Southeastern Librarian,” 64 (2) (Summer 2016): 4.

xxx. Lo and Reed, “’You’re Hired!’,” 4.

xxxi. Lo and Reed, “’You’re Hired!’,” 4.

xxxii. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 376.

xxxiii. American Association of University Women, “AAUW workSmart online, Workbook (2018),” https://www.aauw.org/resources/programs/salary/.

xxxiv. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 386.

xxxv. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 376.

xxxvi. Marks and Harold, “Who asks and who receives in salary negotiation,” 386.

xxxvii. American Association of University Women, “AAUW workSmart online, Workbook (2018),” https://www.aauw.org/resources/programs/salary/.

xxxviii. Niemeier, Cheryl and Junghahn, Lisa, “Everything (Well Almost Everything) is Negotiable: Best Practices for Getting What You Want in Your Job Offer or Performance Review,” AALL Spectrum 15(9) (July 2011): 12; Adelman, Elizabeth, “Librarian’s Taboo: Negotiating Salaries – Session Provides Tips to Increase Job Compensation,” AALL Spectrum 9(1) (September/October2004): 18-19.

xxxix. See 2019 recording https://www.aallnet.org/recording/aall2019-b4-negotiatesalary/

xl. Geraci, Aliqae and Farrell, Shannon, “Normalize Negotiation! Learning to Negotiate Salaries and Improve Compensation Outcomes to Transform Library Culture,” last modified May 22, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2019/normalize-negotiation/.

Chapter 25: Balance, Burn-out, & Mental Health

i. Andrews, Nicola. 2020. “It’s Not Imposter Syndrome: Resisting Self-Doubt as Normal For Library Workers – In the Library with the Lead Pipe.” In the Library with a Lead Pipe. June 10, 2020. http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2020/its-not-imposter-syndrome.

ii. Ettarh, Fobazi. 2018. “Vocational Awe and Librarianship: The Lies We Tell Ourselves – In the Library with the Lead Pipe.” In the Library with a Lead Pipe. January 10, 2018. http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2018/vocational-awe/.

iii. Magee, Rhonda V. 2010. “Educating Lawyers to Meditate?” Papers.Ssrn.Com. Rochester, NY. October 9, 2010. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1689769. 15, 18

iv. Id. , 5, 12-13

v. Id., 15-20

vi. Id., 21-28

vii. See Krieger, Lawrence S., and Kennon M. Sheldon. 2014. “What Makes Lawyers Happy? Transcending the Anecdotes with Data from 6200 Lawyers.” SSRN Electronic Journal. https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2398989, 3-4, footnotes 4-8).

viii. “Above the Law.” n.d. Above the Law. Accessed July 30, 2020. https://abovethelaw.com/health-wellness/.

ix. ABA Commission on Lawyers Assistance Programs. n.d. “Mental Health Resources.” Www.Americanbar.Org. Accessed July 30, 2020. https://www.americanbar.org/groups/lawyer_assistance/resources/covid-19–mental-health-resources/.

x. Ford, Emily. 2008. “Our Librarian Bodies. Our Librarian Selves. – In the Library with the Lead Pipe.” In the Library with a Lead Pipe. December 3, 2008. http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2008/our-librarian-bodies-our-librarian-selves/.

xi. American Library Association- Allied Professional Association. n.d. “Helping to Support Overall Wellness for All Library Workers.” ALA-APA Wellness: Helping to Support Overall Wellness for All Library Workers. Accessed July 30, 2020. https://ala-apa.org/wellness.

xii. American Association of Law Libraries. n.d. “Home – MindfulnessinLawLibrarianshipCaucus.” Community.Aallnet.Org. Accessed July 30, 2020. https://community.aallnet.org/mindfulnessinlawlibrarianshipcaucus/home.

xiii. Ruhlmann, Ellyn. 2017. “Mindful Librarianship.” American Libraries Magazine. June 1, 2017. https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/2017/06/01/mindful-librarianship/.

xiv. See Ettarh, above.

xv. See Andrews, above.

xvi. Merriam-webster. 2019. “Definition of MINDFULNESS.” Merriam-Webster.Com. 2019. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mindfulness.

xvii. See Ford, above.

xviii. For example, see Duke University Student Affairs. n.d. “What Is Wellness? | Student Affairs.” Studentaffairs.Duke.Edu. Accessed July 30, 2020. https://studentaffairs.duke.edu/duwell/what-wellness.

xix. Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke, and Melissa Autumn Wong. 2010. “From Services-Centered to Student-Centered: A ‘Wellness Wheel’ Approach to Developing the Library as an Integrative Learning Commons.” College & Undergraduate Libraries 17 (2–3): 213–24. https://doi.org/10.1080/10691316.2010.490772.

xx. See Ruhlmann, above.

xi. The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society. 2015. “The Tree of Contemplative Practices | The Center for Contemplative Mind in Society.” Www.Contemplativemind.Org. 2015. http://www.contemplativemind.org/practices/tree.

xxii. Miserandino, Christine. 2003. “The Spoon Theory.” https://balanceanddizziness.org/pdf/TheSpoonTheory.pdf.

xxiii. American Association of Law Librarians. 2018. “AALL Conference: From Knowledge to Action.” AALL2018. 2018. https://www.aallnet.org/conference/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2018/06/2018-AALL-Conference-Program.pdf. [information gained from personal attendance at event discussed].

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